Types of Resins For Casting

Different types of resins are regularly used for making casts. Polyester, epoxy and polyurethanes may all be resins, but their properties vary greatly. Many people just end up getting confused about which resin is suitable for a particular purpose.

A detailed look at each class of resin can help clear the uncertainty:

Polyester resin – This is a viscous liquid that is well-resistant to heat, fire and chemicals. It is flexible, cheap and comes in a variety of colors. The excellent features of polyester resin are commonly used to make any porous material rigid and weather resistant – such as fiber glass, bottles, surfboards, skis, fishing rods, laminates and so on. It enjoys great usage in fabricating various parts of ships, aircraft and so on.

While it is quite easy to use, there are numerous other issues associated with polyester resin. It needs to be reinforced with fiber glass to make it mechanically strong. It tends to shrink unpredictably, turns yellow with age, can break easily and lets off a noxious odor. In fact, the user has to use safety gloves, goggles and a respirator to protect himself from the carcinogenic fumes. Proper ventilation is required even during curing to safely air out the fumes.

Epoxy resin – This is the highest performing resin but works out the most expensive too. It has a brownish color and clearer ones tend to cost even more. Epoxy resin boasts of excellent mechanical, chemical, electrical and weather resistant properties, making it a favorite in ship, boat and aircraft components. This resin has low shrinkage and strong adhesive properties. Additionally, there are no toxic odors either.

However, it may take several hours or even days to cure completely. This can still be hastened by changing the curing agent. It is used for multiple purposes – as an adhesive, sealant, paint, varnish and for casting purposes.

Polyurethane resin – This is a versatile, tough and durable material. It has good physical, chemical and electrical properties and can be effectively combined with other resins to increase its usefulness. Polyurethanes come in various viscosities, tend to cure quickly and have a low odor that does not require a respirator either. The only drawback is the moisture sensitivity – they fail to cure properly in humid conditions or in molds containing water.

Polyurethane resin is used as an adhesive, insulation, foam liner in clothing and quick casting of prototypes. Polyurethane casting resins come in opaque and water clear varieties. The former set within a few minutes itself to an ivory color while the latter take a little longer and also need to be de-aired prior to use. Polyurethane casting resins are suitable for making cold castings and expandable ones are also available in the market.

In sum, there are various casting resins and each comes with its own set of benefits and downsides. While polyester resin will cost low, it can be dangerous to use and polyurethane resin may be heavier on the pocket but trumps in versatility and tenacity.

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Kits Available to Learn the Popular Art of Molding Making and Casting

Mold making and casting is an interesting and highly useful art with rewarding results. Indeed, the satisfaction of duplicating something from nothing with your own hands by producing an identical replica of a specimen is does not have to be difficult if use a mold making and casting kit.

Learning the skill of mold making takes practice as with any endeavor. Often the challenge to a beginner is a bit daunting. Since the art form offers such a wide variety of material, a newcomer is faced with multiple selection decisions. There is also the use of special tools and techniques to understand. So that the thought of assembling scores of materials, tools and supplies will often prevent any beginner from getting started.

The many material choices to consider include clays, plaster, polyurethane resin, silicone rubber, liquid latex rubber, alginate, cold casting powder, fibers, fillers, release agent, plaster bandages, paints, solvents, sealants and more. Accessories such as cups, mixing containers, mixers, brushes, knives, gloves and drop cloths all are required.

Getting started is not just about assembling all the required items in the art studio. The mold maker will also have the dilemma of how much material to purchase. For instance, will a pint of polyurethane rubber suffice for making a mold of a sculpture, or is more likely to be a gallon? The mold maker doesn’t want to risk running short of the material in the middle of mold making. On the other hand, storing the surplus material can become a problem in itself as most mold making materials have a shelf life.

What to do?

Top art suppliers are coming to the rescue of beginning mold makers by assembling a variety of useful kits for mold making, casting and even life casting. These kits contain everything needed for a specific project – right from the materials to the tools and accessories. The exact quantity is provided so that there is no waste either.

Therefore, a new mold maker will find silicone mold making rubber, polyurethane resin, mold release, measuring cups and mixers in a certain molding and casting kits. Whereas, a face casting kit is likely to contain alginate powder, casting plaster, plaster bandages, clay, cotton swabs, special cotton fiber, containers, mixing sticks and drop cloths.

Additionally, the kits also come with excellent instructions as well. All one has to do is refer to the simple step-by-step directives as he or she works their way through the kit to create a beautiful work of art.

There are a variety of kits now available online or in art stores designed for specific projects, not only assembled for the beginner, but kits made for experienced and advanced levels, too. One can easily work up to the complicated life casts with ease and practice.

So that if the mold maker wishes to make more of the same artwork, they will be aware of the materials and supplies needed as well as the precise amounts they should buy. No waste of material or money anymore!

So, if you want to try your hand making a professional quality latex mask, all you need to do is to pick up a latex mask kit.

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How to Dress for Interviews at Model Agencies

Your interview is when you set your first impression and more than just getting accepted into the agency, it’s also about the type of modeling jobs you will be awarded. So dress to impress and we are going to give you a few tips on how you can do so.

1. Simplicity is your Mantra.

Simple and presentable is all your clothes need to be. Why? Model agencies want to see your authentic look, which is akin to a canvas for an artist, for the agency. Fancy and elaborate dresses hide your original body look and figure. Stick to solid and preferably dark colors. Most importantly, be comfortable with what you are wearing. Something model agencies are good at telling from your body posture is that how tensed you are. Never show it out, be as relaxed as possible.

2. Avoid makeup, accessories or jewelry

It’s best to not have too much make-up on; just apply a very little amount of foundation or make-up to hide your pimples or some scars. Don’t be afraid of revealing them as agencies would much rather see your natural face than an overly made-up face. Also, you really don’t want them to wipe your face with a cloth or ask you to wash off your makeup that would be a bad sign from the start. Isn’t it? And there is no reason you should be wearing any thick accessories, remove them for the duration of the interview.

The most important thing you need to wear is your confidence. If you can pull off a well-done interview session confidently with minimalistic cosmetics and accessories, it definitely marks you out as someone worth accepting.

3. Avoid overly revealing your body parts

Model agencies want you to sell your style, not your dignity. Never wear something that is over revealing. For example, don’t show too much cleavage. Immediately reject an agency that asks you reveal more than the usual or necessary. Worse of all is nudity; it will indicate the illegitimacy of the agency, because nude modeling is for highly professional and experienced models, never for a new face. Wear properly covered clothing for your own safety as well.

4. Maintain your health and beauty

Days before your interview invest a good amount of time taking care of your skin, hair, and beauty. Moisturize your skin, condition your hair and wash your face regularly. Do get out and get some exercise and make sure you maintain a good figure as you lead up to your interview.

Drink plenty of water, avoid fast food and get plenty of sleep. You might have heard this many times, but leading a healthy lifestyle is of utmost importance in this industry. A healthy lifestyle will naturally lead to a naturally radiant glow on your skin.

All in all, simply be simple. Wear your smile with your confidence. Apart from your dress sense, prepare yourself for the potential questions that might be asked. Whatever your answer, say it confidently. Keep calm and join the modeling world!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9499534

Hobby Or Profession?

Whenever I tell people that I am a sculptor they ask me if I can get an income out of it. Their second question is how I turned my hobby into my job. Another rather funny question is how I make time for this. I seldom think about that but occasionally I look at my work, at the amount and I just know how many hours I spend on each sculpture. This is what I do, my life’s ambition, my profession. I am a sculptor, I make sculptures. I devote my time and my life to this.

People never ask a professional athlete how much time his sport occupies or how he changed his hobby into his job. You just know that. He is a professional athlete so he already made that choice and will dedicate all his time to it. All his future decisions will be dependent on his choice to become a professional athlete. It is the reason for his doing or not doing certain things. And that choice can only be made after spending 10.000 hours practicing your sport to discover whether you’re talented enough. I once heard people say about Sven Kramer that he wasn’t all that talented but had enormous will power.

It is the same for professional artists, for true craftsmen. Once you’ve made that decision, the consequences will reveal themselves. And I remember the exact moment I took that resolution. For me that means a continuous study of forms, I will always work from my heart. I will submerge myself in what touches people and capture it in my sculptures. The foundation of my work is my bewilderment and surprise about man and the world he creates. I am honest and open.

It also means I have to go along my own path, I cannot be part of the heap. I observe humanity and feel the impact it has on me. I try to translate that into my work. I look at society from the side line. But of course I am also part of society and have to meet the demands of that society to be able to keep my occupation. To get by (yes, it’s my livelihood, of course it’s my livelihood, otherwise I wouldn’t be able to stand in front of you). But I need to be able to do lots of other things as well. I must be capable to build a website, negotiate prices, hit the market, search for customers, do public relations, keep a portfolio, know my position with reference to other artists. But the bottom line, the reason I need to learn all those things are my sculptures. That is the consequence of my heart’s acceptance.

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